Delicious Freeze-Dried Yogurt Drops

Freeze dried yogurt dropsFreeze drying yogurt is not only easy – the result is delicious. We talked a bit about it in an earlier post, but thought we’d expand on the topic here.

Yogurt is such a healthy food, especially if it’s low-fat and low (or no) sugar. Yogurt drops make a great snack for little ones because they melt quickly in the mouth, and older kids and adults love the crunchy, creamy taste and texture that’s not like anything else.

These delicious, nutritious snacks are also very easy to make and can be freeze dried in the same run as any other food. But be warned, if you only make one tray you’ll wish you’d made four!

Just use a plastic baggie or cake decorator bag to make small dollops of yogurt on your freeze drying trays and they’ll come out as perfect bite-sized drops.

 

Freeze dried yogurt drops1L3A3111

Or, you can fill your trays to the brim with yogurt. The freeze-dried result is like an airy-peanut brittle than can then be broken into pieces or crushed into a powder. It will store easily bags or jars. And, when you’re ready to rehydrate, just slowly mix water into the yogurt powder or pieces until you get the right consistency.

Freeze dried yogurtFreeze dried Powdered-Greek-Yogurt

Powdered, freeze-dried yogurt also makes an excellent flavoring and additive to pastries and cakes. You won’t believe how moist baked goods are with the addition of powdered yogurt! Experimenting with different flavors is part of the fun. We love the coconut flavor of Chobani Greek yogurt.

Freeze dried yogurt dropsYogurt drops also make great party treats or gifts. In fact, one of our freeze dryer owners is busy making up batches of yogurt drops to give away to her neighbors in decorative jars instead of the traditional plate of Christmas cookies (congratulations to those lucky neighbors!). Yogurt drops are delicious by themselves, but they are also a healthy replacement for sugary chocolate candies in trail and snack mixes.

You can also make tasty drops from pudding or smooth pie fillings (we love key lime pie filling), but of course, these other options aren’t as nutritious as yogurt.

Share your favorite flavor of yogurt drops – and your initial reaction the first time you taste one – either here in the comments or on our Facebook page!

By | 2017-10-19T02:59:17+00:00 December 8th, 2015|17 Comments

17 Comments

  1. nick December 10, 2015 at 10:17 pm - Reply

    I just made a bunch of yogurt drops the other day. GREAT snack!!!!

  2. PENNY December 12, 2015 at 7:18 am - Reply

    hello this is my first time ever on here I don’t know much about this site or you all at all . this looks good these yogurt drops but I didn’t see how to make them can you please tell me how to make them ?? I will need for you to email me because I have to use my best friends computer I can’t afford to have any kind of internet ; lights ; gas for heat or anything at all I am disabled with a spinal cord injury and freeze in my home every winter my best friend is letting me stay with him for a while . so this would be fun I think to make will you please send me the way to make them pretty please thank you kindly please have a very Merry Christmas & A Happy New Year .

    yours truly
    penny

    • Stephanie Barlow December 16, 2015 at 12:12 am - Reply

      Penny,
      You make them by using a ziplock bag filled with yogurt and dropping them onto the freeze dryer trays and putting them inside the freeze dryer. It’s really simple, but you do need a freeze dryer.

  3. tz December 25, 2015 at 6:34 pm - Reply

    What effect does freeze drying have on the “active cultures” – does it kill it/them, or do they recover after rehydrating?

  4. Stephanie Barlow December 28, 2015 at 11:01 pm - Reply

    Theoretically, they recover after rehydrating, but we do not have extensive research to support this. Having said that, we have had customers successfully make yogurt after rehydrating freeze dried yogurt made with our freeze dryers.

    • CB December 29, 2015 at 11:03 pm - Reply

      I do not have a dryer YET, but would like to know the answer to the cultures surviving. Is it possible for someone with a dryer to freeze dry a yogurt with active culture, then try and use it as a start for a fresh batch with fresh milk? Thanks to whoever accepts this challenge!

      I make yogurt often and know the cultures can be kept for extended periods if kept frozen. However, long term storage seems unlikely for them to survive under any circumstance.

      It would be great to first see if short term they survive, and then try a yogurt that was freeze dried a year or more before.

    • Becky Rupert, ND February 16, 2016 at 3:34 pm - Reply

      I thought I’d reply to this post. we have a freeze dryer and LOVE it. Being a Naturopath, it allows me to control what is in my food and I can get the great local nutritious foods in season and enjoy it all year round.
      I freeze dry organic plain yogurt or make my own yogurt and freeze dry it. The cultures are perfect and I just use a tablespoon or so in 1/2 gallon of milk to reculture the milk to make a fresh batch. I even take certain cultures I want incorporated for specific problems and incorporate those into my yogurt. (taking commercial probiotics that I like and culture them in plain yogurt cups overnight then freeze dry them later). I use these cultures to make yogurt when I have a surplus of milk or I can just rehydrate them if I want to use them when I don’t have the fresh milk available.
      Since commercial cultures that you buy in the store are freeze dried anyway for shipping, they should work just fine. I just saw a post for bananas dipped in yogurt and frozen, and I will try freeze drying this but they probably won’t end up in mylar bags, I have to hide our freeze dried homemade ice cream!
      You can probably do this with cheese making cultures too, although I haven’t done it yet… They often go bad in the freezer before I get to use them up.

  5. Susie C January 7, 2016 at 2:37 am - Reply

    If you fill a mylar bag with freeze dried food, can you take a portion of the food out and re-seal the bag?

    • Stephanie Barlow January 11, 2016 at 5:05 pm - Reply

      Yes. If you want it to last a really long time (of for things like meat that can go rancid if air gets to them), it’s best to put a new oxygen absorber in it before you re-seal it.

  6. shadow_matrix0101 March 30, 2016 at 8:26 pm - Reply

    I apologize in advance for the questions, but I’m very new and curious about this technology now available for the home owner.
    1. Do you have any videos or can make one to show how to freeze-dry ice cream? I’m curious how the ice cream keeps from melting during the full 20-40 hours it takes to be completely freeze-dried.
    2. Once dairy items such as ice-cream or the yogurt drops are freeze-dried, wouldn’t the heat of someone’s fingers (for example if you gave the yogurt drops to a child) be enough to melt the items?
    3. How long would they last if kept out on a counter (i.e. apple slices in a bowl left on the kitchen table)? Is it comparable to taking something out of your freezer and having it slowly defrost, only it would take days instead of hours for the freeze-dried items?

    • Stephanie Barlow April 1, 2016 at 7:03 pm - Reply

      1) We don’t have a video on making freeze-dried ice cream, but you just scoop it out on the freeze drying trays and put it in your freezer. When you are ready to freeze dry it, the freeze dryer first freezes the food to -30 to -50 degrees and then the food stays frozen while all the water is removed and the food is still really cold until the food is completely dry. But, inside the freeze dryer is always cold, so it won’t ever “melt” during the freeze drying process.
      2) The items are dry and no longer have water in them, so they do not “melt” in your hands. At that point they are no longer frozen. They are just like the yogurt drops you buy at the grocery store for babies. They don’t melt or change with touch.
      3) Apple slices left on the counter would slowly start to rehydrate from the moisture in the air. That’s not necessarily a problem, but if you would like your apples crunchy so you can continue to snack on them as you’d like, just keep them in a container that keeps out the air like a mason jar or a glass jar with a closable lid and they will stay perfectly crunchy. And, no, it’s not comparable to taking it out of your freezer and having it defrost. Freeze dried items have the water removed so they are not cold when they are done, they are crunchy or brittle or can easily powder. You can rehydrate items by adding water back into the food. You might enjoy watching some of our videos to learn more. http://www.harvestright.com/videos

  7. Wendy Freeman June 22, 2016 at 3:26 pm - Reply

    I have tried three times to make yogurt drops. They are delicious but always spread out. They taste fine, but don’t look like yours do. How do I make them keep the drop shape instead of being a glob. Do I need to put the trays in the freezer for a while before putting the yogurt on them so they are cold?

    • Stephanie Barlow June 22, 2016 at 6:48 pm - Reply

      Yes, starting with cold trays helps. We use Yoplait yogurt. Start with the yogurt nice and cold and then as soon as you finish a tray, put it right into the freezer to set up while you work on your other trays.

  8. Megan July 20, 2017 at 7:34 am - Reply

    Is there an actual recipe here?

  9. Heidi August 13, 2017 at 1:40 pm - Reply

    The Greek Gods now make a chocolate cherry yogurt!!!! It is thicker so easier to pipe onto the tray and it taste amazing! And they use honey and sugar cane versus HFCS which is a huge bonus; one in which doesn’t take away from the deliciousness!

  10. Christine Hackett September 1, 2017 at 4:14 pm - Reply

    What was the freeze and dry times? Can’t find the settings from anyone.

    • Matt Neville September 5, 2017 at 8:32 am - Reply

      The standard settings are great for yogurt drops.

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