Why You Should Choose Freeze Drying

Freeze Drying: The Best Preservation Method

Last week we wrote about freeze drying vs. dehydrating as a method of food preservation. Regardless of preservation method it’s up against (whether it’s dehydrating, canning or even freezing in your regular freezer), freeze drying always comes out the clear winner.  Maybe the best argument for freeze drying, however, is variety. Almost any food can be freeze-dried for healthy snacks, short-term preservation or long-term emergency food storage. Meats, fruits, vegetables, dairy, desserts – even full meals can be freeze dried and easily re-hydrated.

On top of that, a greater variety of foods can be freeze dried than can’t be dehydrated. Everything from ice cream to raw meat can be freeze dried, making it a clear winner in the freeze drying versus dehydrating debate. In fact, many freeze dryer owners begin emptying their freezers and storing those same items on their pantry shelves. For example, did you know you can freeze-dry cottage cheese, yogurt, sour cream, even shredded cheese and store it without refrigeration? How about raw eggs or scrambled eggs and ham? Or, even better, how about these mini cheesecakes or your family’s favorite recipe?

1L3A7561-Cheesecake

Reducing Food Waste

Reducing food waste is another great reason to own a home freeze dryer. When you consider that almost 40 percent of the food families purchase is wasted, preservation of meat and dairy products, leftovers and ripening fruits and vegetables starts to feel essential.

20160210-DSC_0064Food gets thrown out for a lot of reasons. Families make or buy too much food to start with, fail to reheat leftovers, or simply forget about food in the back of the fridge or on the counter until it goes bad. A home freeze dryer, can be used to easily eliminate these problems, thus saving families time and money.

Freeze-dried foods offer a longer shelf life, lower moisture content, and generally taste better than dehydrated foods. Freeze-dried foods re-hydrate faster and also retain their original shape, taste, and color. And, many foods make perfect snacks even without re-hydrating.

Now it’s your turn! Knowing more about freeze drying and the way it removes all the water from your food, which foods have you tried or would you like to try freeze dried? Like us on Facebook and let us know!

By | 2017-10-19T02:59:13+00:00 February 16th, 2016|10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Dennis Hayes February 17, 2016 at 7:21 am - Reply

    Hi,
    Years ago, I remember seeing a television commercial for a brand-name instant coffee. Their unique method of preserving the best attributes of a delicious cup o’ coffee were simply…” it’s freeze-dried! ”
    Yet I’m not seeing much from HarvestRight about this specific area of food. And to be sure, fixed up with an assortment of flavors and other things like creamers and toppings, as well as having its own distinct beneficial properties, coffee has for all intents and purposes, become as much a food as a beverage. What did the manufacturers of freeze-dried coffee figure out that HARVESTRIGHT has not?
    As a coffee lover, i hate to waste my coffee as much as any food…is their hope on the horizon for those of us who know how to make a pot of coffee that can rival any retail coffee shop for full-bodied flavor and satisfaction but can only drink two to three cups of an eight cup pot?
    I’ve no doubt that more than a few million potential customers look forward in anticipation ( alertly, I might add!) to your reply.
    Thanks,
    D.D. Hayes

    • Scott Neville February 18, 2016 at 2:03 pm - Reply

      Thank you for your comment. A number of customers currently freeze dry coffee. They have great success, although the quantity is limited to what will fit on the trays.

  2. Carol Wilson February 23, 2016 at 10:13 am - Reply

    I see a lot of your ads with foods stored in glass jars. Does this not defeat the purpose of keeping it stored in a oxygen free container?

    • Stephanie Barlow February 23, 2016 at 11:12 am - Reply

      Great question. Many of our customers choose to store the food in mason jars, but they make sure to remove the oxygen from the jar either with an oxygen absorber or a special attachment. At that point it is important to keep the jars in a cool dark place. If done properly, the food will keep for many years. Additionally, some choose to put food in jars without removing the oxygen because they aren’t planning on the food lasting years and years. These customers use their freeze dried food day to day for healthy eating and living. For longest shelf life, choose high quality mylar bags or #10 cans with an oxygen absorber.

  3. sharon1 February 23, 2016 at 3:26 pm - Reply

    I liked your site and would prefer the cheesecake to try. But what I’d really like to try is blueberries. Is there a way to get a small sample? thanks

    • Stephanie Barlow February 23, 2016 at 3:31 pm - Reply

      If you call in, customer service would be happy to send you a sample. The only charge is for shipping.

  4. Lawrence September 23, 2016 at 6:34 pm - Reply

    How about freeze drying pats of butter?

    • Stephanie Barlow September 27, 2016 at 10:17 am - Reply

      Unfortunately, butter cannot be freeze dried. There is no water to remove, only oil. And, oil doesn’t freeze dry. You can have butter in meals or foods and the food will still freeze dry, but plain butter doesn’t freeze dry. (Also, chocolate and peanut butter and plain oil cannot be freeze dried for these same reasons.)

  5. Lynn May 31, 2017 at 9:20 am - Reply

    I have a question regarding yogurt. How do you make the drops and stop it from turning into powder?

    • Matt Neville May 31, 2017 at 10:59 am - Reply

      Greek yogurt tends to powder more than traditional yogurt. We typically use Yoplait, but other brands may work well too.

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